Badía Leblich, Domingo
alias Ali Bey.
Born in Barcelona in 1767, the son of a government official, he was himself  appointed to an official position as Administrator of the  Tobacco Concession in Cordoba, but he studied science in spare time - particularly physics, botany and mathematics - as well as geography. he wrote and translated several scientific works. In 1801 he proposed to the Prime Minister, Godoy, his Plan de Viaje al Africa con objetos políticos y científicos (Plan to visit Africa for Political and Scientific Purposes). He argued that because the Muslim states were inhabited by a fanatical population, it would be necessary to disguise himself as a Muslim in order to travel freely. He set off in 1803 disguised as a Syrian Muslim who had grown up in Europe and forgotten much of Arab culture except the Quran.. After staying several months in Tangier, he began his trip in February 1804. He visited Marrakesh in April 1804. and eventually went on via Tripoli to Alexandria, then went through Syria to Istanbul and reached Vienna in January 1808. His account Voyages d'Ali-Bey en Afrique et en Asie pendant les années 1803, 1804, 1805, 1806, et 1807 was published in three volumes in Paris in 1814 and subsequently translated into several European languages.  His section on Morocco was republished in Spain in 1984 (Ali Bey Viajes)       Link to Maps by Badía

Briarly, Alexander (Alejandro)
Briarly, a British subject was appointed Spanish Consul-General in Tangier in 1823 or 1824. His successor Antonio de Beramendí Y Freire, and a Vice-Consul, José Rico, were appointed in 1828, but Brairly seems not to have left immediately (Calendario Manual y Guia de Forasteros en Madrid)
 
Brown
Mr Brown, "the Surgeon sent hither to attend the Sultan."

Chaillet, R.
British Vice-Consul in Mogador, 1829. He left in July 1830 and wrote an account of his return trip to Europe "Observations on the Western Coast of the Marocco state during my journey from Mogador to Tangier in July & August 1830." William Wiltshire (or Willshire) was appointed to replace him in October 1831.

Douglas, James Sholto
James  Sholto Douglas, a former army Major, son of the collector of customs in Jamaica. He was appointed Consul in July 1817 but because of plague did not take up his position  until 1821. In the meantime Isaac Abensur his Vice Consul acted for him. Douglas went on leave from June 1827 but was  not allowed to return by Sultan till 4 March 1828, and resigned  for reasons of ill-health in  April 1829. He died January 1830.
 
 Drummond-Hay, Edward William Auriol 
EdwardWilliam Auriol Drummond-Hay was born on 4 Apr 1785 and married Louisa Margaret Thomson on 14 December 1812. Military service: Major, 73rd Regiment, 1816. Elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland in 1823 when employed as a Clerk to the Lord Lyon King of Arms. He was Secretary of SAS 1827-1828. In 1829 he was appointed Consul at Tangier, Morocco, and arrived to take up his  post on 25 August 1829 He died on 28 February 1845 at Tangier, aged 59, and was replaced by his son John. Drummond-Hay Family tree.

 (portrait of EWA Drummond-Hay courtesy of Robert Drummond-Hay)
 
 
 
 
 

Drummond-Hay, Edward
b. 4 March 1815 d. January 1884
Appointed clerk in Colonial Office in 1834 through the influence of Robert Hay.
Drummond-Hay Family tree.
 

Drummond-Hay, John

b.  1 June 1816 d November 1893 
Sir John Hay Drummond-Hay was born on 1 June 1816. At the age of 15, in 1832, he paid his first visit to Tangier and then, in 1834 toured Spain with his tutor Gregorio de Borgas y Tarius. In 1840 he was briefly assistant to the Consul at Alexandria, Egypt, before moving to Constantinople where he worked first under Lord Ponsonby and then under Sir Straford Canning, the a rchitect of British proposals for reform of the Ottoman Empire. In July 1844 he went to Tangier to take up position as Assistant to his father, the Consul-General. His father died on 28 February 1845 and John was appointed to act in his stead. On 7 Oct 1845 he married Annette Carstensen, daughter of Johan Arnold Heironymus Carstensen, the Danish consul in Tangier. He was knighted in 1862 and promoted toMinister Plenipotentiary in 1874. 

From A Memoir of Sir John Drummond-Hay
    Sir John helped organise the Madrid Conference on consular protection 1879-80. He retired on 3 July 1885 and died in Tangier on 27 November 1893 aged 77. Drummond-Hay Family tree.
 

Duguid, John
John Duguid was a merchant in Gibraltar. Just before he left Tangier for his trip, Drummond-Hay drew £500 at 30 days sight upon the Treasury in favour of Duguid. FO52/31, Drummond-Hay to Murray, Tangier, 20 October 1829 encloses Copy Drummond-Hay to Lords Commissioners of Treasury, Tangier 20 October 1829.

Hay-Drummond, Henrietta Auriol  
d.1832
Evidently, Harriet was a family name. Drummond-Hay Family tree.
 
Hay-Drummond, Edward Auriol
b. 10  April  1758, married Elizabeth de Vismes, 1782
Dean of Bocking, Prebendary of York & Southwell, Rector of Hadleigh, and a Chaplain in Ordinary to George II and George IV. Drummond-Hay Family tree.
 
  George Douglas, 16th Earl of Morton died 17 July 1827.

Schousboe, Peter Kofoed Anker
Danish Consul in Tangier, appointed 12 December 1800; Appointed Consul-General in 1821. Died in office, 25 February 1832 and replaced as Consul-General by  Johan Arnold Carstensen. The Schousboes whom Drummond-Hay met up with in Marrakesh were the consul's son Peter and his younger brother Frederick.
(Information supplied by K Kjoelsen, Head of the Archives and Library, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Asiatisk Plads 2, DK-1488, Kobenhavn K, Denmark)

  Smith,William Mein
  Before setting out, E.W. Drummond Hay asked General Don, the Governor of Gibraltar, for officers to help him on his journey. He wanted a medical officer and "another whose science in various departments might enable me to collect many valuable facts for which I might not be able to depend upon my own unassisted observation . . " Don sent James Edward Williams, Assistant Surgeon of the Ordnance Medical Department and Lt. William Mein Smith of the Royal Artillery. (FO52/31, Hay to Murray, Rabat, 22 November 1829 [3rd letter])  Smith joined the R.A. as a Gentleman Cadet, became 2nd Lieutenant in June 1822, 1st Lieutenant in November 1827 2nd Captain in November 1839 and  retured on half-pay in April 1842. He was stationed  in Canada, July 1823- August 1828 and in Gibraltar February 1829  to April 1836. (Askwith, List)

Traissinet, A.
 Consul for the Netherlands

Washington, John
1800-1863
Naval surveyor. Joined the British Royal Navy May 1812, served in war against United States, then off Greenland coast protecting whalers. Royal Naval College 1814-1816, passed out with gold medal for proficeincy in mathematics. Served on North American and South American Stations. Lieutenant 1821. Served in West Indies and Mediterranean. Returned to England  1828 and took leave of absence to accompany Drummond-Hay 1830-1833. His account of this trip  was published in the first volume of the Journal of the  Royal Geographical Society of London in 1832, of which he was a foundation member, Flag lieutenant to Admiral of the Nore. 1833 Commander. 1836 Secretary  of Royal Geographical Society. 1841-47 commander of various survey ships. Fellow of the Royal Society 1845. Naval Hydrographer 1855-63. Rear Admiral 1862. Noted for delicate health and extraordinary attentiion to detail. See Dictionary of National Biography.

Williams, James Edward
Before setting out, E.W. Drummond Hay asked General Don, the Governor of Gibraltar, for officers to help him on his journey. He wanted a medical officer and "another whose science in various departments might enable me to collect many valuable facts for which I might not be able to depend upon my own unassisted observation . . " Don sent James Edward Williams, Assistant Surgeon of the Ordnance Medical Department and Lt. William Mein Smith of the Royal Artillery. (FO52/31, Hay to Murray, Rabat, 22 November 1829 [3rd letter])

Willshire, William  British Vice-Consul in Mogador 1825-26 and 1831-February 1845,  when he was replaced by William Grace, Vice-Consul. His salary during the second period was £100 a year.  In Parliamentary Papers for 1834 xli. 387,  and in the Royal Geographical Society archives his name is spelt "Willshire," but in other official papers he is referred to as "Wiltshire." In 1845, he drew a sketch-map of  southern Morocco for the Royal Geographical Society of London and provided a commentary on part of it